Bibliografia

Krzysztof Jagielski
23.08.2015

Bibliografia

Barnett, Randy E., A Consent Theory of Contract, „Columbia Law Review,” r. 86 (1986), s. 269–321.

· __________, The Structure of Liberty: Justice and The Rule of Law, Oxford University (Clarendon) Press, New York 1998.

· Binswanger, Harry, red., The Ayn Rand Lexicon: Objectivism from A to Z, New American Library, New York 1986.

· Black’s Law Dictionary, wyd. 6, West Publishing, St. Paul, Minn. 1990.

· Block, Walter, Defending the Undefendable, Fleet Press, New York 1976.

· __________, A Libertarian Theory of Blackmail, „Irish Jurist,” r. 33 (1998), s. 280–310.

· __________, Toward a Libertarian Theory of Blackmail, „Journal of Libertarian Studies,” r. 15, nr 2 (wiosna 2001).

· __________, Toward a Libertarian Theory of Inalienability: A Critique of Rothbard, Barnett, Gordon, Smith, Kinsella and Epstein, „Journal of Libertarian Studies,” r. 17, nr 2 (wiosna 2003).

· Bouckaert, Boudewijn, What is Property?, [w:] Symposium: Intellectual Property, „Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy,” r. 13, nr 3 (wiosna 1990).

· Breyer, Stephen, The Uneasy Case for Copyright: A Study of Copyright in Books, Photocopies, and Computer Programs, „Harvard Law Review,” r. 84 (1970).

· Chisum, Donald S., Chisum on Patents, Matthew Bender, New York 2000.

· Comeaux, Paul E., Kinsella, N. Stephan, Protecting Foreign Investment Under International Law: Legal Aspects of Political Risk, Dobbs Ferry, Oceana Publications, N.Y. 1997.

· Epstein, Richard, Blackmail, Inc., „University of Chicago Law Review,” r. 50 (1983).

· Evers, Williamson M., Toward a Reformulation of the Law of Contracts, „Journal of Libertarian Studies,” r. 1, nr 1 (zima 1977), s. 3–13.

· Franck, Murray I., Ayn Rand, Intellectual Property Rights, and Human Liberty, 2 kasety magnetofonowe, Institute for Objectivist Studies Lecture, 1991.

· __________, Intellectual Property Rights: Are Intangibles True Property?, „IOS Journal,” r. 5, nr 1 (kwiecień 1995).

· __________, Intellectual and Personality Property, „IOS Journal,” r. 5, nr 3 (wrzesień 1995).

· Friedman, David D., Standards As Intellectual Property: An Economic Approach, „University of Dayton Law Review,” r. 19, nr 3 (wiosna 1994), s. 1109–1129.

· __________, In Defense of Private Orderings: Comments on Julie Cohen’s ‘Copyright and the Jurisprudence of Self-Help’, „Berkeley Technology Law Journal,” r. 13, nr 3 (jesień 1998), s. 1152–1171.

· __________, Law’s Order: What Economics Has to do with Law and Why it Matters, Princeton University Press, Princeton, N.J. 2000.

· Frost, Robert, The Mending Wall, [w:] North of Boston, wyd. 2, Henry Holt, New York 1915.

· Galambos, Andrew J., The Theory of Volition, t. 1, pod red. Peter N. Sisco, Universal Scientific Publications, San Diego 1999.

· Ginsburg, Jane C., Copyright, Common Law, and Sui Generis Protection of Databases in the United States and Abroad, „University of Cincinnati Law Review,” r. 66 (1997).

· Goldstein, Paul, Copyright: Principles, Law, and Practice, Little, Brown, Boston 1989.

· Gordon, Wendy J., An Inquiry into the Merits of Copyright: The Challenges of Consistency, Consent, and Encouragement Theory, „Stanford Law Review,” r. 41 (1989).

· Halliday, Roy, Ideas as Property, „Formulations,” r. 4, nr 4 (lato 1997).

· Hammer, Richard O., Intellectual Property Rights Viewed as Contracts, „Formulations,” r. 3, nr 2 (zima 1995–96).

· Hayek, F. A., The Collected Works of F.A. Hayek, t. 1, Fatal Conceit: The Errors of Socialism, pod red. W. W. Bartley, University of Chicago Press, Chicago 1989 [wyd. pol. Hayek, F. A., Zgubna pycha rozumu. O błędach socjalizmu, Arcana, Kraków 2004].

· Hegel, Georg W. F., Hegel’s Philosophy of Right, tłum. T. M. Knox. 1821; wznowienie, Oxford University Press, London 1967.

· Herbener, Jeffrey M., The Pareto Rule and Welfare Economics, „Review of Austrian Economics,” r. 10, nr 1 (1997), s. 79–106.

· Hildreth, Ronald B., Patent Law: A Practitioner’s Guide, wyd. 3, Practising Law Institute, New York 1998.

· Hoppe, Hans-Hermann, Fallacies of the Public Goods Theory and the Production of Security, „Journal of Libertarian Studies,” r. 9, nr 1 (zima 1989), s. 27–46.

· __________, A Theory of Socialism and Capitalism, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston 1989.

· __________, In Defense of Extreme Rationalism: Thoughts on Donald McCloskey’s The Rhetoric of Economics, „Review of Austrian Economics,” r. 3 (1989), s. 179–214.

· __________, The Economics and Ethics of Private Property, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston 1993.

· __________, Economic Science and the Austrian Method, Ludwig von Mises Institute, Auburn, Ala. 1995.

· __________, The Private Production of Defense, „Journal of Libertarian Studies,” r. 14, nr 1 (zima 1998–1999), s. 27–52.

· Hülsmann, Jörg Guido, Knowledge, Judgment, and the Use of Property, „Review of Austrian Economics,” r. 10, nr 1 (1997), s. 23-48.

· Hume, David, An Inquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals: With a Supplement: A Dialogue, 1751; wznowienie, Liberal Arts Press, New York 1957 [wyd. pol. Hume, David, Badania dotyczące zasad moralności, PWN, Warszawa 1975].

· de Jasay, Anthony, Against Politics: On Government, Anarchy, and Order, Routledge, London 1997.

· Jefferson, Thomas, Letter to Isaac McPherson, Monticello, August 13, 1813, [w:] The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, t. 8, pod red. A. A. Lipscomb, A. E. Bergh, Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, Washington, D.C. 1904.

· Justinian, The Institutes of Justinian: Text, Translation, and Commentary, tłum. J.A.C. Thomas, North-Holland, Amsterdam 1975.

· Kelley, David, David Kelley vs. Nat Hentoff: Libel Laws: Pro and Con, Free Press Association, Liberty Audio, 1987.

· __________, Reply to N. Stephan Kinsella, ‘Letter on Intellectual Property Rights’, IOS Journal 5, nr 2 (czerwiec 1995).

· Kinsella, N. Stephan, A Civil Law to Common Law Dictionary, „Louisiana Law Review,” r. 54 (1994), s. 13, s. 1265–1305.

· __________, Letter on Intellectual Property Rights, „IOS Journal,” r. 5, nr 2 (czerwiec 1995), s. 12–13.

· __________, A Libertarian Theory of Punishment and Rights, „Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review,” r. 30 (wiosna 1996).

· __________, New Rationalist Directions in Libertarian Rights Theory, „Journal of Libertarian Studies,” r. 12, nr 2 (jesień 1996), s. 313–326.

· __________, Is Intellectual Property Legitimate?, „Pennsylvania Bar Ass’n Intellectual Property Law Newsletter,” r. 1, nr 2 (zima 1998), s. 3.

· __________, Inalienability and Punishment: A Reply to George Smith, „Journal of Libertarian Studies,” r. 14, nr 1 (zima 1998–1999), s. 79–93.

· __________, Knowledge, Calculation, Conflict, and Law: Review Essay of Randy E. Barnett, The Structure of Liberty: Justice and The Rule of Law, „Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics,” r. 2, nr 4 (zima 1999), s. 49–71.

· __________, A Theory of Contracts: Binding Promises, Title Transfer, and Inalienability, artykuł zaprezentowany podczas Austrian Scholars Conference, Auburn, Ala., kwiecień 1999.

· Kitch, Edmund, The Nature and Function of the Patent System, „Journal of Law and Economics,” r. 20 (1977).

· Long, Roderick T., The Libertarian Case Against Intellectual Property Rights, „Formulations,” r. 3, nr 1 (jesień 1995).

· Machlup, Fritz, An Economic Review of the Patent System, Study No. 15, Subcomm. On Patents, Trademarks & Copyrights, Senate Comm. On the Judiciary, 85th Cong., 2nd Sess. (Comm. Print 1958).

· Machlup, Fritz, Penrose, Edith, The Patent Controversy in the Nineteenth Century, „Journal of Economic History,” r. 10 (1950).

· Mack, Eric, In Defense of Blackmail, „Philosophical Studies,” r. 41 (1982).

· Mackaay, Ejan, Economic Incentives in Markets for Information and Innovation, [w:] Symposium: Intellectual Property, „Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy,” r. 13, nr 3 (lato 1990).

· McCarthy, J. Thomas, McCarthy on Trademarks and Unfair Competition, wyd. 4, West Group, St. Paul, Minn. 1996.

· McElroy, Wendy, Contra Copyright, „The Voluntaryist” (czerwiec 1985).

· __________, Intellectual Property: Copyright and Patent, [w:] The Debates of Liberty, pod red. Wendy McElroy, Lexington Books, Lanham, MD 2003.

· Meiners, Roger E., Staaf, Robert J., Patents, Copyrights, and Trademarks: Property or Monopoly?, [w:] Symposium: Intellectual Property, „Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy,” r. 13, nr 3 (lato 1990).

· Milgrim, Roger M., Milgrim on Trade Secrets, Matthew Bender, New York 2000.

· Miller, Arthur R., Davis, Michael H., Intellectual Property: Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights in a Nutshell, wyd. 2, West Publishing, St. Paul, Minn. 1990.

· Mises, Ludwig von, The Ultimate Foundation of Economic Science: An Essay on Method, wyd. 2, Sheed Andrews and McMeel, Kansas City 1962.

· __________, Human Action, wyd. 3 poprawione, Henry Regnery, Chicago 1966.

· __________, The Theory of Money and Credit, tłum H.E. Batson. 1912; wznowienie, Liberty Fund, Indianapolis, Ind. 1980.

· __________, Epistemological Problems of Economics, tłum. George Reisman, New York University Press, New York 1981.

· __________, Socialism: An Economic and Sociological Analysis, wyd. 3 poprawione, tłum. J. Kahane, Liberty Press, Indianapolis, Ind. 1981.

· Moore, Adam D., red., Intellectual Property: Moral, Legal, and Ethical Dilemmas, Rowman and Littlefield, New York 1997.

· Nance, Dale A., Foreword: Owning Ideas, [w:] Symposium: Intellectual Property, „Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy,” r. 13, nr 3 (lato 1990).

· National Commission on New Technological Uses (CONTU) of Copyright Works, Final Report, 31 lipiec 1978, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. 1979.

· Nimmer, Melville B., Nimmer, David, Nimmer on Copyright, Matthew Bender, New York 2000.

· Nozick, Robert, Anarchy, State, and Utopia, Basic Books, New York 1974 [wyd. pol. Nozick, Robert, Anarchia, państwo, utopia, Aletheia, Warszawa 1999].

· Palmer, Tom G., Intellectual Property: A Non-Posnerian Law and Economics Approach, „Hamline Law Review,” r. 12 (1989).

· __________, Are Patents and Copyrights Morally Justified? The Philosophy of Property Rights and Ideal Objects, [w:] Symposium: Intellectual Property, „Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy,” r. 13, nr 3 (lato 1990).

· Plant, Arnold, The Economic Theory Concerning Patents for Inventions, [w:] Selected Economic Essays and Addresses, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London 1974.

· Posner, Richard A., Economic Analysis of Law, wyd. 4, Little, Brown, Boston 1992.

· Prusak, Leonard, The Economic Theory Concerning Patents and Inventions, „Economica,” r. 1 (1934), s. 30–51.

· __________, Does the Patent System Have Measurable Economic Value?, „AIPLA Quarterly Journal,” r. 10 (1982), s. 50–59.

· Rand, Ayn, Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal, New American Library, New York 1967.

· Reisman, George, Capitalism: A Treatise on Economics, Jameson Books, Ottawa, Ill. 1996.

· Rothbard, Murray N., Man, Economy, and State, Nash Publishing, Los Angeles 1962.

· __________, An Austrian Perspective on the History of Economic Thought, t. 1, Economic Thought Before Adam Smith, Edward Elgar, Brookfield, Vt. 1995.

· __________, The Logic of Action One, Edward Elgar, Cheltenham, U.K. 1997.

· __________, The Ethics of Liberty, New York University Press, New York 1998.

· Schulman, J. Neil, Informational Property: Logorights, „Journal of Social and Biological Structures” (1990).

· Spencer, Herbert, The Principles of Ethics, t. 2. 1893; wznowienie, Liberty Press, Indianapolis, Ind. 1978.

· Spooner, Lysander, The Law of Intellectual Property: or An Essay on the Right of Authors and Inventors to a Perpetual Property in Their Ideas, [w:] The Collected Works of Lysander Spooner, t. 3, pod red. Charles Shively, 1855; wznowienie, M&S Press, Weston, Mass. 1971.

· Tuccile, Jerome, It Usually Begins with Ayn Rand, Cobden Press, San Francisco 1971.

· van Slyke, Paul C., Friedman, Mark M., Employer’s Rights to Inventions and Patents of Its Officers, Directors, and Employees, „AIPLA Quarterly Journal,” r. 18 (1990).

· Walker, Jesse, Copy Catfight: How Intellectual Property Laws Stifle Popular Culture, „Reason” (marzec 2000).

· Walterscheid, Edward C., Thomas Jefferson and the Patent Act of 1793, „Essays in History,” r. 40 (1998).

Źródła elektroniczne

· Aharonian, Greg, Bustpatents, http://www.bustpatents.com.

· Bibliography of General Theories of Intellectual Property, [w:] Encyclopedia of Law and Economics, http://encyclo.findlaw.com/biblio/1600.htm.

· Cole, Julio H., Patents and Copyrights: Do the Benefits Exceed the Costs?, http://www.economia.ufm.edu.gt/Catedraticos/jhcole/Cole%20_MPS_.pdf.

· Foerster, Stephen, The Basics of Economic Government, http://www.economic.net/articles/ar0001.html.

· Franklin Pierce Law Center, Intellectual Property Mall, http://www.ipmall.fplc.edu.

· Free World Order, Invention and Intellectual Property, http://www.buildfreedom.com/ft/intellectual_property.htm.

· IBM, Gallery of Obscure Patents, http://www.patents.ibm.com/gallery.

· Intellectual Property Owners Association, IPO Daily News, http://www.ipo.org.

· Kinsella, N. Stephan, In Defense of Napster and Against the Second Homesteading Rule, http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig/kinsella2.html, 4 wrzesień 2000 [wyd. pol. Kinsella, N. Stephan, W obronie Napstera i przeciwko Drugiej Zasadzie Zagospodarowania, http://www.miasik.net/articles/kinsella.html, obszerny fragment].

· Kuester, Jeffrey, Kuester Law: The Technology Law Resource, http://www.kuesterlaw.com.

· Library of Congress (Biblioteka Kongresu), Thomas: Legislative Information on the Internet, http://thomas.loc.gov.

· New York Intellectual Property Law Association, FAQ on IP, http://www.nyipla.org/public/10_faq.html.

· Oppedahl & Larson LLP, Intellectual Property Law Web Server, http://www.patents.com.

· Patent and License Exchange, http://www.pl-x.com.

· Patent and Trademark Office Society, Home Page, http://www.ptos.org.

· Patent Auction, Online Auction for Intellectual Properties, http://www.patentauction.com.

· Source Translation Optimization, Legal Resources and Tools for Surviving the Patenting Frenzy of the Internet, Bioinformatics, and Electronic Commerce, http://www.bustpatents.com.

· United States Copyright Office (Urząd ds. Praw Autorskich), http://lcweb.loc.gov/copyright.

· United States Department of Commerce, Patent and Trademark Office (Departament Handlu, Urząd ds. Pantentów i Znaków Handlowych), http://www.uspto.gov.

· Universal Scientific Publications Company, http://www.tuspco.com.

· Wacky Patent of the Month, http://colitz.com/site/wacky.htm.

· Woodcock, Washburn, Kurtz, Mackiewicz, Norris, Legal Links, http://www.woodcock.com/links/links.htm.

[1] Autor pragnie podziękować Wendy McElroy oraz Gene’owi Callahanowi za ich pomocne komentarze odnoszące się do wcześniejszego szkicu. Poglądy zawarte tutaj są wyłącznie zdaniem autora i nie powinny być przypisywane żadnej innej osobie czy instytucji. Poprzednia wersja niniejszego artykułu została przedstawiona na Austrian Scholars Conference w Auburn, Alabama, 25. marca 2000. Skondensowany zbiór niektórych argumentów zawartych tutaj w: N. Stephan Kinsella, In Defense of Napster and Against the Second Homesteading Rule, 4. września 2000 [wyd. pol. Kinsella, N. Stephan, W obronie Napstera i przeciwko Drugiej Zasadzie Zagospodarowania, obszerny fragment]. Kontakt z autorem: kinsella@swbell.net.

[2] Pojęcia takie jak: „realty,” „personalty” czy „tangible” należą do słownika prawa zwyczajowego, w odróżnieniu od, odpowiednio, analogicznych terminów prawa stanowionego: „immovables,” „movables” i „corporeals,” Inne różnice dotyczące terminologii prawa stanowionego i prawa zwyczajowego, patrz: N. Stephan Kinsella, A Civil Law to Common Law Dictionary, „Louisiana Law Review,” nr 54 (1994), s. 1265–1305. „Dobra” (ang. „things”) to szeroka koncepcja wywodząca się z prawa rzymskiego, która odnosi się wszystkich typów rzeczy, zarówno materialnych, jak i niematerialnych.

[3] Debata na ten temat objawia się w różnicach w kwestii zbywalności takich praw, tj. tego, czy zgodnie z prawem kontraktu możemy „sprzedać” lub zbyć nasze ciała jako podmiot praw w taki sam sposób, w jaki zbywa się tytuł do zawłaszczonego mienia. Dla argumentów przeciwników niezbywalności cielesnej, patrz: N. S. Kinsella, A Theory of Contracts: Binding Promises, Title Transfer, and Inalienability (artykuł zaprezentowany w kwietniu 1999 r. podczas Austrian Scholars Conference w Auburn, Alabama); oraz N. S. Kinsella, Inalienability and Punishment: A Reply to George Smith, „Journal of Libertarian Studies,” nr 1 (14) (zima 1998–1999), s. 79–93. Argumentów zwolenników niezbywalności u: W. Block, Toward a Libertarian Theory of Inalienability: A Critique of Rothbard, Barnett, Gordon, Smith, Kinsella, and Epstein, „Journal of Libertarian Studies,” r. 17, nr 2 (wiosna 2003), s. 39–85.

[4] Aby zapoznać się z poglądami przeciwników prawnej ochrony przed szantażem, patrz: W. Block, Toward Libertarian Theory of Blackmail, „Journal of Libertarian Studies” 15, nr 2, wiosna 2001; Idem, A Libertarian Theory of Blackmail, „Irish Jurist,” r. 33 (1998), s. 280–310; Idem, Defending the Undefendable, Fleet Press, New York 1976, s. 53–54; M. N. Rothbard, The Ethics of Liberty, New York University Press, NY 1998, s. 124–126 oraz E. Mack, In Defense of Blackmail, „Philosophical Studies,” r. 41 (1982), s. 274.

Czytelnika zainteresowanego poglądami obrońców takich regulacji odsyłamy do: R. Nozick, Anarchy, State and Utopia, Basic Books, New York 1974, s. 85–86 oraz R. Epstein, Blackmail Inc., „University of Chicago Law Review,” r. 50 (1983), s. 553.

Libertariańskie argumenty przeciw prawnej ochronie przed zniesławieniem (zwykłym oszczerstwem czy zniesławieniem na piśmie) można znaleźć m.in. u: W. Block, Defending…, s. 50–53, M.N. Rothbard, The Ethics…, s. 126–128. Dla przybliżenia poglądów zwolenników tej koncepcji, patrz: D. Kelley, David Kelley vs. Nat Hentoff, Libel Laws: Pro and Con, nagranie na taśmie magnetofonowej, Free Press Association, Liberty Audio, 1987.

[5] W niektórych krajach europejskich [w tym w Polsce (patrz: Ustawa: Prawo własności przemysłowej z 30 czerwca 2000r.) – przyp. tłum.], zamiast terminu „własność intelektualna” używa się pojęcia „własności przemysłowej.”

[6] De La Vergne Refrigerating Mach. Co. v Featherstone, 147 U.S. 209, 222, 13 S.Ct. 283, 285 (1893).

[7] T. G. Palmer, Are Patents and Copyrights Morally Justified? The Philosophy of Property Rights and Ideal Objects, Symposium: Intellectual Property, „Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy,” r. 13, nr 3 (lato 1990), s. 818. Jak zauważył jeden z komentatorów: „własność intelektualną można zdefiniować jako obejmującą prawa do zawartych w materialnych tworach wysiłku umysłowego oryginalnych idei.” D. A. Nance, Foreword: Owning Ideas, [w:] Symposium: Intellectual Property, „Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy,” r. 13, nr 3 (lato 1990), s. 757.

[8] Przydatny wstęp do zagadnień IP w prawie amerykańskim, można znaleźć m.in. w: A. R. Miller, M. H. Davis, Intellectual Property: Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights in a Nutshell, wyd. 2, West Publishing, St. Paul, Minnessota 1990; także: Patent, Trademark, and Trade Secret. Z kolei, aby zapoznać się z prawem patentowym, patrz: R. B. Hildreth, Patent Law: A Practitioner’s Guide, wyd. 3, Practising Law Institute, New York 1998. Bardziej pogłębione rozprawy naukowe nt. IP: D. S. Chisum, Chisum on Patents, Matthew Bender, New York 2000; M. B. i D. Nimmer, Nimmer on Copyright, Matthew Bender, New York 2000; P. Goldstein, Copyright: Principles, Law, and Practice, Little, Brown, Boston 1989; J. T. McCarthy, McCarthy on Trademarks and Unfair Competition, wyd. 4, West Group, St. Paul, Minnessota 1996; oraz: R. M. Milgrim, Milgrim on Trade Secrets, Matthew Bender, New York 2000. Użyteczne informacje, broszury są dostępne w Amerykańskim Urzędzie Praw Autorskich, oraz w Urzędzie Patentowym i Znaków Handlowych Departamentu Handlu. Adresy innych pożytecznych stron www znajdują w bibliografii.

[9] [Przyp. PM.] Termin „własność intelektualna” kojarzony jest z szeroką gamą dóbr niematerialnych zarówno stanowiących przedmiot regulacji prawa autorskiego i praw pokrewnych, jak i będących innego rodzaju wytworami ludzkiego intelektu (wynalazki, znaki towarowe, wzory przemysłowe).

Prawo autorskie i prawa pokrewne (prawa własności intelektualnej) stanowią w Polsce konglomerat rozwiązań i instytucji zaczerpniętych z rożnych źródeł prawodawczych, kwalifikowane mogą być do szeroko rozumianego prawa cywilnego. PA należą do stosunkowo nowej w polskim porządku prawnym i samodzielnej kategorii praw bezwzględnych. Podmiotom praw autorskich i pokrewnych przysługuje monopol w zakresie korzystania i rozporządzania dobrami stanowiącymi przedmiot tych praw. Wyłączność ta może być ograniczona jedynie z mocy prawa albo woli – swobodnej decyzji podmiotu uprawnionego. Wynika to z art. 17 ustawy o prawach autorskich i pokrewnych: „jeżeli ustawa nie stanowi inaczej, twórcy przysługuje wyłączne prawo do korzystania z utworu i rozporządzania nim, na wszystkich polach eksploatacji oraz do wynagrodzenia za korzystanie z utworu.”

Prawa autorskie i pokrewne jako prawa bezwzględne są chronione przed wszelkimi ich naruszeniami dokonywanymi przez inne nieuprawnione podmioty, w tym także przez podmioty, które łączy z osobami wyłącznie uprawnionymi stosunek umowny. Prawa autorskie i pokrewne są głównie prawami na dobrach niematerialnych, co wynika z charakteru ich przedmiotu, tj. dóbr, które nie wymagają dla swojego istnienia substratu materialnego, czyli dające się prawnie wyodrębnić obiekty niematerialne np.: utwory, artystyczne wykonania.

Jako prawa bezwzględne na dobrach niematerialnych, prawa autorskie i pokrewne zbliżone są konstrukcyjnie do praw rzeczowych, a zwłaszcza do prawa własności. Podobieństwo miedzy tymi prawami mimo ewidentnych różnic (przedmiotem prawa własności są dobra materialne) przejawia się w określeniu praw autorskich i pokrewnych jako tzw. własności intelektualnej.

Prawa autorskie jako bezwzględne prawa podmiotowe chronią duchowe i materialne interesy twórcy związane z jego dziełem. Tradycyjnie wyróżnia się dwie grupy uprawnień składających się na podmiotowe prawo autorskie – prawa osobiste i majątkowe.

Polska ustawa z 1994 r. oparta jest na wywodzącym się z francuskiego prawa autorskiego modelu dualistycznym. Istotą założenia jest, iż prawo autorskie w istocie rzeczy składa się z majątkowych uprawnień przenaszalnych inter vivos ograniczonych w czasie, oraz praw osobistych nieograniczonych w czasie i nieprzenaszalnych. Nie oznacza to, że nie dostrzega się nieraz bardzo silnych związków pomiędzy jednymi i drugimi uprawnieniami, jednakże wychodzi się z założenia, że pełna przenaszalność od początku praw majątkowych lepiej służy potrzebom obrotu.

Ustawa wyraźnie definiuje i oddziela treść majątkowych i osobistych praw autorskich – a czyni to w rozdziale zatytułowanym „Treść prawa autorskiego.” Ogólną zasadą wyrażoną w ustawie jest, że prawo autorskie służy twórcy. Ustawa przewiduje możliwość przysługiwania prawa autorskiego innym podmiotom niż twórca tylko w odniesieniu do majątkowych praw autorskich (tak jest w wypadku utworów zbiorowych i programów komputerowych). W odniesieniu do kwestii regulacji obrotu autorskimi prawami majątkowymi dopuszcza się przejście tych praw w drodze dziedziczenia lub w drodze umów o przeniesienie (por szerzej E. Traple w: Z. Radwański, red., „System prawa prywatnego, tom 13.” Warszawa 2004 r. s. 26–28 i 110–120).

[10] [Przyp. tłum.] USC – United States Code to kodyfikacja prawa stanowionego przez legislatywę USA – dwuizbowy Kongres, na który składa się Senat i Izba Reprezentantów. Przyjętą praktyką jest uchwalanie przez kongres tzw. ustaw szkieletowych, stanowiących bazę dla rozwiązań tworzonych przez administrację prezydencką i Prezydenta. Dlatego też niezmiernie ważny jest CFR, o którym poniżej. Na temat US Code, patrz: Legal Information Institute.

CFR – Code of Federal Relations to zbiór powszechnie obowiązujących i trwałych reguł prawnych publikowanych w Federalnym Rejestrze przez poszczególne departamenty i agencje rządu federalnego. CFR jest podzielone na 50 poddziałów reprezentujących szeroki wachlarz przedmiotowy federalnych regulacji. Każdy tom kodeksu jest uaktualniany raz do roku a wydawany raz na kwartał. Więcej informacji można znaleźć pod adresem: GPO Access.

HR – Izba Reprezentantów USA.

[11] 17 USC §§ 101, 106 i nast..

[12] Współczesne prawo autorskie wyparło i w dużej mierze zastąpiło „zwyczajowe prawo autorskie,” mające po stworzeniu dzieła automatyczne zastosowanie, zapewniając w gruncie rzeczy jedynie prawo pierwszej publikacji. Goldstein, Copyright, §§ 15.4 et seq.

[13] 17 USC § 302. Zgodnie z ostatnimi zmianami legislacji przedłużono czas obowiązywania praw autorskich o kolejne 20 lat. patrz: HR 2589, Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act/Fairness in Music Licensing Act of 1998.

[14] 35 USC § 1 et seq.; 37 CFR Part 1.

[15] Przypuśćmy, że A jest wynalazcą lepszej pułapki na myszy, którą patentuje. Sprężyna tej pułapki składa się z Nitinolu (metal pamięci), co umożliwia lepsze chwytanie myszy. A teraz przypuśćmy, że B wynajdzie i również opatentuje pułapkę na myszy z taką samą sprężyną, która dodatkowo pokryta będzie powłoką zapobiegającą przywieraniu, co z kolei ułatwi usunięcie pozostałości myszy, bez zakłócenia działania Nitinolu. B musi mieć pułapkę ze sprężyną z Nitinolu, aby skorzystać ze swojego wynalazku, ale narusza to prawa patentowe A. Podobnie A nie może dodać do swojego wynalazku specjalnej powłoki, nie naruszając przy tym patentu B. W takich sytuacjach dwaj posiadacze patentów mogą wymienić się licencjami, by A mógł wykorzystać ulepszenie B w swojej pułapce, zaś B mógł używać swojego wynalazku.

[16] Diamond v Diehr, 450 US 175, 185 (1981); także: 35 USC § 101.

[17] In re Alappat, 33 F3d 1526, 1544, 31 USPQ2d 1545, 1557 (Fed Cir 1994) (in banc). Także: State Street Bank & Trust Co. v Signature Financial Group, 149 F3d 1368 (Fed Cir 1998).

[18] 35 USC § 154(a)(2).

[19] Patrz np: R. M. Halligan, esq., Restatement of the Third Law – Unfair Competition: A Brief Summary, §§ 39–45; także: Uniform Trade Secrets Act (UTSA).

[20] Patrz: Uniform Trade Secrets Act (UTSA).

[21] Economic Espionage Act of 1996, 18 USC §§ 1831–1839.

[22] 15 USC § 1501 et seq.; 37 CFR Part 2.

[23] 15 USC §§ 1125(c), 1127.

[24] Cyberquatting – to forma przetrzymywania i używania należącego do kogoś znaku handlowego w celu uzyskania korzyści finansowych (swego rodzaju okupu) za zaprzestanie tego typu działań. W najbardziej rozpowszechnionej formie polega na wykupywaniu domen internetowych, np. solidarnosc.com, aby później oferować ich sprzedaż zainteresowanym (którzy mieliby do nich prawo na mocy ustaw o znaku handlowym) po wyższej cenie – tłum.

Więcej na ten temat, patrz: 15 USC § 1125(d); Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act, PL 106–113 (1999); HR 3194, S1948.

[25] Patrz: 17 USC § 901 et seq.

[26] Patrz: 17 USC § 1301 et seq.

[27] Patrz np.: HR 354 (wprowadzone 19.01.1999), Collections of Information Antipiracy Act. Także: J. C. Ginsburg, Copyright, Common Law, and Sui Generis Protection of Databases in the United States and Abroad, „University of Cincinnati Law Review,” r. 66 (1997), s. 151.

[28] Konstytucja Stanów Zjednoczonych, art I, § 8; Kewanee Oil Co. v. Bicron Corp., 415 US 470, 479, 94 S.Ct. 1879, 1885 (1974).

[29] Patrz: P. C. van Slyke i M. M. Friedman, Employer’s Rights to Inventions and Patents of Its Officers, Directors, and Employees, „AIPLA Quarterly Journal,” r. 18 (1990), s. 127; oraz: Chisum on Patents, § 22.03; 17 USC §§ 101, 201.

[30] Konstytucja Stanów Zjednoczonych, art. 1, sec. 8, clause 3; Wickard v Filburn, 317 US 111, 63 S. Ct. 82 (1942).

[31] Patrz jednak federalny Economic Espionage Act of 1996, 18 USC §§ 1831–1839.

[32] Ayn Rand błędnie zakłada, że ten, kto pierwszy złoży wniosek patentowy, ma pierwszeństwo (i Rand podejmuje się potem wyczerpującej obrony tego twierdzenia). Patrz: A. Rand, Patents and Copyrights, s. 133. Pisarka także mylnie atakuje ściśle antytrustowy krytycyzm wobec posiadaczy patentów. Lecz, skoro patenty są nadawanymi przez państwo monopolami, korzystanie z ustaw antymonopolowych w celu ograniczenia rozszerzania ochrony patentowej poza dotychczasowe granice nie jest niesprawiedliwe. Problem z prawami antytrustowymi polega na ich stosowaniu w normalnych, pokojowych umowach przedsiębiorców, nie zaś w ograniczaniu prawdziwych, tj. państwowo nadanych, monopoli. Podobne spostrzeżenie można odnieść do przypadku Billa Gatesa, którego fortuna w znacznej mierze została zbudowana na koniecznym dla praw autorskich państwowym monopolu. Ponadto, skoro Bill Gates, nie jest libertarianinem, a także bez wątpienia nie sprzeciwia się ustawodawstwu antytrustowemu, toteż trudno załamywać ręce z żalu nad tym, jakiego piwa sobie nawarzył.

[33] Nie mających swojej cielesnej, materialnej postaci – tłum.

[34] Patrz: A. J. Galambos, The Theory of Volition, pod red. Peter N. Sisco, Universal Scientific Publications, San Diego 1999; J. N. Schulman, Informational Property: Logorights, „Journal of Social and Biological Structures” (1990); i A. Rand, Patents and Copyrights, [w:] Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal, New American Library, New York 1967. Inni obiektywiści (zwolennicy Rand) popierający IP, to m.in.: G. Reisman, Capitalism: A Treatise on Economics, Jameson Books, Ottawa, Ill. 1996, s. 388–389; D. Kelley, Response to Kinsella, „IOS Journal,” r. 5, nr 2 (czerwiec 1995), s. 13, w odpowiedzi N. Stephanowi Kinselli, Letter on Intellectual Property Rights, „IOS Journal,” r. 5, nr 2 (czerwiec 1995), s. 12–13; M. I. Franck, Ayn Rand, Intellectual Property Rights, and Human Liberty, (na 2 taśmach magnetofonowych), Institute for Objectivist Studies Lecture; Laissez-Faire Books, 1991; Idem, Intellectual Property Rights: Are Intangibles True Property, „IOS Journal,” r. 5, nr 1 (kwiecień 1995); oraz Intellectual and Personality Property, „IOS Journal,” r. 5, nr 3 (wrzesień 1995), s. 7, w odpowiedzi na Kinselli: Letter on Intellectual Property Rights. Niezwykle ciężko opublikowane materiały dyskutujące poglądy Galambosa; jest tak najwyraźniej ze względu na dziwaczny fakt, iż teorie te zabraniają ich rozpowszechniania nawet jego uczniom i zwolennikom. Patrz np.: J. Tuccille, It Usually Begins with Ayn Rand, Cobden Press, San Francisco 1971, s. 69–71. Rozproszone wzmianki i omówienia poglądów Galambosa można jednak znaleźć w: D. Friedman, In Defense of Private Orderings: Comments on Julie Cohen’s ‘Copyright and the Jurisprudence of Self-Help’, „Berkeley Technology Law Journal,” r. 13, nr 3 (jesień 1998), przypis 52; oraz: S. Foerster, The Basics of Economic Government.

[35] Aby zapoznać się z tradycyjnymi teoriami nt. IP, patrz: Bibliography of General Theories of Intellectual Property, „Encyclopedia of Law and Economics”; oraz E. Kitch, The Nature and Function of the Patent System, „Journal of Law and Economics,” r. 20 (1977), s. 265.

[36] L. Spooner, The Law of Intellectual Property: or An Essay on the Right of Authors and Inventors to a Perpetual Property in Their Ideas [w:] The Collected Works of Lysander Spooner, 1855, wznowienie pod red. Charlesa Shively, t. 3, M&S Press, Weston, Mass 1971; H. Spencer, The Principles of Ethics, t. II, 1893; przedruk, Liberty Press, Indianapolis, Ind. 1978, cz. IV, roz. 13, s. 121. Także: W. McElroy, Intellectual Property: Copyright and Patent, http://www.zetetics.com/mac/intpro1.htm i http://www.zetetics.com/mac/intpro2.htm; oraz T.Palmer, op. cit., s. 818, 825.

[37] Patrz: T. Palmer, Are Patents and Copyrights…, s. 819.

[38] R.A. Posner, Economic Analysis of Law, wyd. 4, Little, Brown, Boston 1992, § 3.3, s. 38–45.

[39] D. D. Friedman, Standards As Intellectual Property: An Economic Approach, „University of Dayton Law Review,” r. 19, nr 3 (wiosna 1994), s. 1109–1129; oraz Idem, Law’s Order: What Economics Has to Do with Law and Why it Matters, Princeton University Press, Princeton, N.J 2000, roz. 11. Jak wcześniejsi obrońcy IP, J.S. Mill i J. Bentham, także E. Mackaay broni IP na gruncie utylitarnym – patrz: Economic Incentives in Markets for Information and Innovation, [w:] Symposium: Intellectual Property, „Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy,” r. 13, nr 3, s. 867. Patrz również: A. Plant, The Economic Theory Concerning Patents for Inventions, [w:] Selected Economic Essays and Addresses, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London 1974, s. 44; R. E. Meiners, R. J. Staaf, Patents, Copyrights, and Trademarks: Property or Monopoly?, [w:] Symposium: Intellectual Property, „Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy,” r. 13, nr 3, s. 911.

[40] Patrz: T. Palmer, Are Patents and Copyrights…, s. 820–821; Julio H. Cole, Patents and Copyrights: Do the Benefits Exceed the Costs?

[41] Patrz: M. N. Rothbard, Man, Economy, and State (dalej jako: MES), Nash Publishing, Los Angeles 1962, s. 652–660, Idem, The Ethics of Liberty, s. 123–124; W. McElroy, Contra Copyright, „The Voluntaryist,” czerwiec 1985, Idem, Intellectual Property…; T. G. Palmer, Intellectual Property: A Non-Posnerian Law and Economics Approach, „Hamline Law Review,” nr 12 (1989), s. 261, „Policy,” r. 13, nr 3, s. 775; Idem, Are Patents and Copyrights…?; Na temat Lepage’a, patrz: Mackaay, Economic Incentives, s. 869; Boudewijn Bouckaert, What is Property?, [w:] Symposium: Intellectual Property, „Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy,” r. 13, nr 3, s. 775; N. S. Kinsella, Is Intellectual Property Legitimate?, „Pennsylvania Bar Association Intellectual Property Law Newsletter,” r. 1, nr 2 (zima 1998), s. 3; Idem, Letter on Intellectual Property Rights, oraz In Defense of Napster and Against the Second Homesteading Rule.

Również F.A. Hayek zdaje się przeciwstawiać patentom, patrz: F. A. Von Hayek, Zgubna pycha rozumu: o błędach socjalizmu (tłum. M. i T. Kunińscy), Arcana, Kraków 2004, s. 56–57; oraz: Meiners i Staaf, op. cit., s. 911. Utylitarnej argumentacji na rzecz patentów i praw autorskich przeciwstawia się Cole w: Patents and Copyrights: Do the Benefits Exceed the Costs?. Także: F. Machlup, Podkomisja Senatu USA ds. Patentów, Znaków handlowych i praw autorskich, An Economic Review of the Patent System, 85. kong., 2. sesja, 1958, studium nr 15; F. Machlup i E. Penrose, The Patent Controversy in the Nineteenth Century, „Journal of Economic History,” r. 10 (1950), s. 1; R. T. Long, The Libertarian Case Against Intellectual Property Rights, „Formulations,” r. 3, nr 1 (jesień 1995); S. Breyer, The Uneasy Case for Copyright: A Study of Copyright in Books, Photocopies, and Computer Programs, „Harvard Law Review,” r. 84 (1970), s. 281; W. J. Gordon, An Inquiry into the Merits of Copyright: The Challenges of Consistency, Consent, and Encouragement Theory, „Stanford Law Review,” r. 41 (1989), s. 1343; oraz J. Walker, Copy Catfight: How Intellectual Property Laws Stifle Popular Culture, „Reason” (marzec 2000).

[42] McElroy, Intellectual Property: Copyright and Patent. Również silnym przeciwnikiem IP był XIX-wieczny dziennikarz William Leggett, patrz: Palmer, Are Patents and Copyrights…?, s. 818, 828–829. Ludwig von Mises nie wyraził swojej opinii, zarysowując jedynie ekonomiczne skutki obecności lub braku tychże praw w obowiązującym ustawodawstwie, patrz: Human Action, wyd. 3, Henry Regnery, Chicago 1966, roz. 23, dział 6, s. 661–662.

[43] Wg Justyniana: „Sprawiedliwość to ciągłe i wieczne życzenie, aby oddawać każdemu wedle jego zasług. (…) Zgodnie z maksymami prawa należy: żyć uczciwie, nie krzywdzić nikogo, przyznawać innym słuszność.” Instytucje Justyniana, tłum C. Kunderewicz, PWN, Warszawa 1986.

[44] Wadami utylitaryzmu i interpersonalnych porównań użyteczności zajął się M. Rothbard – parz: M. N. Rothbard, Praxeology, Value Judgments, and Public Policy, [w:] The Logic of Action One, U.K.: Cheltenham 1997, w szczeg. s. 90–99; Idem, Toward a Reconstruction of Utility and Welfare Economics, [w:] Ibidem; A. de Jasay, Against Politics: On Government, Anarchy, and Order, London: Routledge 1997, s. 81–82, 92, 98, 144, 149–151.

Na temat scjentyzmu i empiryzmu, patrz: Rothbard, The Mantle of Science, [w:] op. cit.; H.-H. Hoppe, In Defense of Extreme Rationalism: Thoughts on Donald McCloskey’s The Rhetoric of Economics, „Review of Austrian Economics,” r. 3 (1989), s. 179.

O epistemologicznym dualizmie, patrz: L. von Mises, The Ultimate Foundation of Economic Science: An Essay on Method, wyd. 2, Sheed Andrews and McMeel, Kansas City 1962; Idem, Epistemological Problems of Economics, tłum. George Reisman, NY University Press, New York 1981; H.-H. Hoppe, Economic Science and the Austrian Method, Ludwig von Mises Institute, Auburn 1995; i Hoppe, In Defense of Extreme….

[45] Mises pisze: „Pomimo tego, że zwykło się mówić o pieniądzu jako o mierze wartości i cen, stwierdzenie to jest całkowicie błędne. Na ile akceptujemy subiektywną teorię wartości, nie możemy podnosić kwestii pomiaru.” On the Measurement of Value, [w:] The Theory of Money and Credit, tłum. H.E. Batson; przedruk Liberty Fund, Indianapolis 1980, s. 51. Również: „Pieniądz nie stanowi kryterium miary wartości czy cen. Nie mierzy wartości. Tak samo ceny nie są mierzone w pieniądzu, lecz są jego ilościami.” Idem, Socialism: An Economic and Sociological Analysis, tłum. J. Kahane, wyd. 3 poprawione, Liberty Press, Indianapolis 1981, s. 99; także: Mises, Human Action, s. 96, 122, 204, 210, 217 i 289.

[46] Autorem doskonałego podsumowania i krytyki uzasadnienia patentów i praw autorskich poprzez kryteria zysków i strat jest: Cole, Patents and Copyrights: Do the Benefits Exceed the Costs? Użyteczna dyskusja nad dowodami w tym względzie, patrz: Palmer, Intellectual Property: A Non-Posnerian Law…, s. 300–302; Idem, Are Patents and Copyrights…, s. 820–821, 850–851; Bouckaert, op. cit., s. 812–813; L. Prusak, Does the Patent System Have Measurable Economic Value?, „AIPLA Quarterly Journal,” t. 10 (1982), s. 50–59; oraz Idem, The Economic Theory Concerning Patents and Inventions, „Economica,” t. 1(1934), s. 30–51.

[47] Aby poznać inne przykłady kosztów patentów i praw autorskich patrz: Cole, Patents and Copyrights:….

[48] Plant, The Economic Theory…, s. 43. Także: M. Rothbard, MES, s. 658–659: „Nie jest w żaden sposób oczywiste, że patenty są czynnikiem zachęcającym do wzrostu wielkości wydatków na badania. Z pewnością jednak patenty zniekształcają rodzaj wydatków badawczych. (…) Są one pobudzane w nadmierny sposób na początku, zanim patent zostanie zdobyty, a następnie, w okresie, kiedy patent już zostanie przyznany, zbytnio ograniczane. Dodatkowo, niektóre z wynalazków uważa się za podlegające prawu patentowemu, podczas gdy inne nie. Tak więc, system patentowy ma też wpływ na sztuczne stymulowanie takich dziedzin badawczych, w których wynalazki mogą zostać opatentowane, zaś w dziedzinach niepatentowanych sztucznie ogranicza on badania.”

[49] A. Rand, Patents and Copyrights, s. 130.

[50] Plant ma rację twierdząc, że: „[z]adanie rozróżnienia naukowego odkrycia od podlegającej prawu patentowemu praktycznej implementacji (…) jest często nazbyt kłopotliwe nawet dla najzręczniejszego prawnika.” The Economic Theory Concerning Patents for Inventions, s. 49–50. W podobnej kwestii Sąd Najwyższy stwierdził: „[s]pecyfikacje i wnioski patentowe to jeden z najtrudniejszych do precyzyjnego użycia instrumentów prawnych.” Topliff v Topliff, 145 US 156, 171, 12 S.Ct. 825 (1892). Być może właśnie z braku zakotwiczenia w obiektywnych granicach materialnej własności wynika wrodzona niejasność, niejednoznaczność, amorfia i subiektywność patentów. Tylko z tego ostatniego powodu można by pomyśleć, że Obiektywiści – gorliwi, samozwańczy obrońcy obiektywizmu i przeciwnicy subiektywizmu – będą również przeciwni patentom i copyright.

[51] In re Trovato, 33 USPQ2d 1194 (Fed Cir 1994). Niedawne kazusy poszerzają ochronę patentową nad pewnymi rodzajami algorytmów matematycznych oraz informatycznych, a także metod biznesowych. Patrz np.: State Street Bank & Trust Co. v Signature Financial Group, 149 F3d 1368 (Fed Cir 1998). Jednakże niezależnie od tego, gdzie aktualnie przebiega granica między niepodlegającymi patentowaniu „prawami natury” czy „abstrakcyjnymi ideami” a patentowanymi „zastosowaniami praktycznymi,” prawo patentowe wciąż musi ją wyznaczać.

[52] Spooner, The Law of Intellectual Property; McElroy, Intellectual Property:…; Palmer, Are Patents and Copyrights…?, s. 818, 825.

[53] Patrz: Galambos, The Theory of Volition, t. 1; E. R. Soulé, Jr., What Is Volitional Science? Czytałem tylko szkicowe opracowania dot. teorii Galambosa. Spotkałem również, ku swojemu zaskoczeniu (myślałem, że są oni wytworami fantazji Tuccille’a [It Usually Begins with Ayn Rand, s. 69–71]), żywych jej zwolenników – było to wiele lat temu podczas konferencji w Mises Institute w Auburn, w Alabamie. Chciałbym jednak zaznaczyć, że moja krytyka poglądów Galambosa jest poprawna tylko do tego stopnia, w jakim poprawna jest moja o nich wiedza.

[54] D. Friedman, In Defense of Private Orderings, przyp. 52; Foerster, The Basics of Economic Governement.

[55] A. Rand, Patents and Copyrights, s. 133.

[56] D. Friedman, op. cit., przyp. 52.

[57] Tuccille, op. cit., s. 70. Rzecz jasna, gdyby jakikolwiek uczeń Galambosa poza nim samym miał podobny dylemat, nie mógłby uczynić tak samo, bo przecież jest to niezbywalna, „absolutna” idea należąca do Galambosa.

[58] H. Binswanger, red., The Ayn Rand Lexicon: Objectivism from A to Z, New Amerian Library, New York 1986, s. 326–327, 467.

[59] Podstawową ekonomiczną, czy też katalaktyczną,* rolą praw własności prywatnej jest umożliwienie, wraz wynikającymi z wymiany tej własności cenami pieniężnymi, kalkulacji ekonomicznej. Patrz: N. S. Kinsella, Knowledge, Calculation, Conflict, and Law: Review Essay of Randy E. Barnett, The Structure of Liberty: Justice and the Rule of Law, „Quarterly Journal of Austrian Economics,” r. 2, nr 4 (zima 1999), s. 49–71.

*Katalaksja (ang. catallaxy) to analiza tych ludzkich działań, które przeprowadzane są w oparciu o kalkulację monetarną (patrz: L. von Mises, Human Action, wyd. 4 poprawione, Fox & Wilkes, s. 258) – red.

[60] H-H. Hoppe, A Theory of Socialism and Capitalism, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston 1989, s. 235.

[61] Plant, The Economic Theory…, s. 35–36; D. Hume, Badania dotyczące zasad moralności, PWN, Warszawa 1975; Palmer, Intellectual Property:…, s. 261–266 i przyp. 50 (odróżnienie rzadkości „stałej” od „dynamicznej”), także s. 279–280; Palmer, Are Patents and Copyrights…?, s. 860–861, 864–865; oraz Rothbard, Justice and Property Rights, [w:] The Logic of Action One, s. 274; Na temat Tuckera, patrz: McElroy, Intellectual Property: Copyright and Patent.

[62] H-H. Hoppe, Ibidem, s. 140–141. Nie chcę tu zawężać praw do tych postrzeżonych. Pojęcie „widoczności” oznacza tu tyle, co pojęcia „obserwowalności” i „rozróżnialności.” Uwagę tą zawdzięczam Gene’owi Callahanowi.

[63] R. Frost, The Mending Wall, [w:] North in Boston, wyd. 2, Henry Holt, New York 1915, s. 11–13. (Szanowny Czytelniku, proszę, nie kieruj do mnie uwag na ten temat. Nie dbam o to, co Frost „miał na myśli” pisząc swój wiersz. Po prostu podoba mi się powiedzenie.)

[64] H-H. Hoppe, Ibidem, s. 138.

[65] Właściwe podejście do zasady pierwotnego zawłaszczenia (rozróżnienie pierwszy-kolejny) można znaleźć m.in. w: Hoppe, A Theory of Socialism…, s. 141–144; Idem, The Economics and Ethics of Private Property, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Boston 1993, s. 191–193; J. M. Herbener, The Pareto Rule and Welfare Economics, „Review of Austrian Economics,” r. 10, nr 1 (1997), s. 105: „Kiedy już jakiś przedmiot zostanie zawłaszczony przez pierwszego użytkownika, inni być nim nie mogą. Wówczas ich preferencje tracą podporę w efektywniejszej w sensie Pareto zasadzie pierwotnego zawłaszczenia.”; oraz de Jasay, Against Politics, s. 172–179. Aby zapoznać się z etycznym uzasadnieniem takiego rozwiązania kwestii praw własności, patrz: Hoppe, A Theory of Socialism…, roz. 7; Idem, The Economics and Ethics of Private Property; Rothbard, The Ethics of Liberty; Rothbard, Justice and Property Rights, [w:] The Logic of Action One; N. Stephan Kinsella, A Libertarian Theory of Punishment and Rights, „Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review,” r. 30 (wiosna 1996), s. 607; N. Stephan Kinsella, New Rationalist Directions in Libertarian Rights Theory, „Journal of Libertarian Studies,” r. 12, nr 2 (jesień 1996), s. 313–326.

[66] T. Jefferson do I. McPhersona (Monticello, 13 sierpnia 1813), list w: The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, pod red. A.A. Lipscomb i A.E. Bergh, t. 13, Thomas Jefferson Memorial Association, Washington, D.C. 1904, s. 326–338. Jefferson zdawał sobie sprawę z tego, że patenty i prawa autorskie nie są prawami naturalnymi, ponieważ idee nie są dobrami rzadkimi. Jeśli w ogóle można owe prawa uzasadnić, to jedynie dla utylitarnej promocji użytecznych wynalazków i prac literackich (nawet wtedy muszą być sztucznymi zapisami ustawowymi, gdyż nie należą do praw naturalnych). Patrz: Palmer, Intellectual Property: A Non-Posnerian Law…, s. 278, przyp. 53. To jednak nie oznacza, że Jefferson był zwolennikiem patentów, choćby na podbudowie utylitarnej. Historyk patentów Edward C. Walterscheid wyjaśnia, iż: „przez całe życie [Jefferson] zachował zdrowy sceptycyzm co do wartości systemu patentowego.” Thomas Jefferson and the Patent Act of 1793, „Essays in History,” r. 40 (1998).

[67] Rand, Patents and Copyrights, s. 131. Mises przyznaje (Human Action, s. 661), że oszczędne gospodarowanie „formułami” jest niepotrzebne, „gdyż ich zdolności użytkowe są niewyczerpywalne.” Na s. 128, wskazuje: „Dobro oddające takie bezgraniczne usługi to choćby wiedza o skutkach działań. Formuła, przepis na przyrządzenie kawy, gdy już go poznamy, oddaje nam nieograniczone usługi. Korzystanie z niego nie umniejsza jego zdolności produkcyjnych – jego moce produkcyjne są nieograniczone – nie jest więc dobrem ekonomicznym. Działający człowiek nie musi nigdy wybierać między wartością użytkową znanej formuły a innym użytecznym przedmiotem.”

[68] Plant, The Economic Theory Concerning Patents…, s. 36. Także: Mises, Human Action, s. 364: „Takie formuły są, z reguły, dobrami wolnymi, ponieważ ich zdolność do generowania konkretnych efektów jest nieskończona. Mogą się stać dobrami ekonomicznymi jedynie jeśli zostaną zmonopolizowane, a ich użycie ograniczone. Cena płacona za użytek z formuły jest zawsze monopolistyczna. Nie ma też znaczenia, czy ograniczenie jej stosowania stało się możliwe ze względów instytucjonalnych – takich jak patenty czy prawo autorskie – czy wynika z tego, że formuła jest trzymana w sekrecie i inni ludzie nie mogą jej odgadnąć.”

[69] Bouckaert, What is Property?, s. 793 oraz s. 797–799.

[70] Ibidem, s. 799, 803.

[71] Można twierdzić, że niematerialne dobra zasługują na ochronę prawną jako własność, ponieważ są „dobrami publicznymi,” tj. ze względu na negatywne koszty zewnętrzne braku prawnej ochrony IP. Jednakże koncepcja „dóbr publicznych” jest niespójna i nie do uzasadnienia. Patrz: Palmer, Intellectual Property: A Non-Posnerian Law…, s. 279–280, 283–287; H.-H. Hoppe, Fallacies of the Public Goods Theory and the Production of Security, „Journal of Libertarian Studies,” r. 9, nr 1 (zima 1989), s. 27; także: Idem, The Economics and Ethics of Private Property, roz. 1. Palmer wskazuje, że: „kosztem wyprodukowania każdej z usług czy dóbr jest nie tylko praca, marketing i inne komponenty kosztowe, ale także koszty ogrodzenia (wyłączenia). Na przykład kina inwestują w kasy, ściany czy bileterów, by wykluczyć tych, którzy za z dostarczenie rozrywki nie zapłacili. W innym przypadku właściciele filmów mogliby oczywiście zainstalować projektory i ekrany w miejscach publicznych i dopiero wtedy starać się powstrzymać przechodniów przed oglądaniem, czy też poprosić rząd o zmuszenie wszystkich niepłacących do noszenia specjalnych okularów, które uniemożliwiłyby uczestnictwo w seansie. Kina samochodowe, by chronić się przed gapowiczami podglądającymi przez ogrodzenia, zainstalowały – znacznym kosztem – osobne głośniki dla każdego samochodu, sprawiając tym samym, że odbiór obrazu przez podglądających stał się mało interesujący. (…) Koszty wyłączenia są związane z produkcją praktycznie każdego dobra. Nie istnieje przekonywająca argumentacja na rzecz wyróżniania danej kategorii dóbr i nalegania, by rząd ubezpieczał ich koszty produkcji poprzez jakieś usankcjonowane państwowo kolektywne działania – a wszystko to przez zwyczajny dekret, by upowszechnić dobro na zasadach nikogo nie wyłączających.” Palmer, Intellectual Property: A Non-Posnerian Law…, s. 284–285. Nie da się jasno wykazać, że idee są dobrami publicznymi. Ponadto, gdyby nawet były, nie uzasadnia to traktowania ich jak praw własności – podobnie uzasadnieniem nie jest zwiększanie przez nie dobrobytu, jak zobaczyliśmy powyżej.

[72] Palmer, Intellectual Property: A Non-Posnerian Law…, s. 264.

[73] Patrz: Rand, Patents and Copyrights; Kelley, Response to Kinsella; Franck, Intellectual and Personality Property oraz Intellectual Property Rights: Are Intangibles True Property?

[74] Patrz: Hoppe, A Theory of Socialism and Capitalism, rozdz. 7, szczególnie s. 138.

[75] Hoppe, A Theory of Socialism and Capitalism, s. 142; de Jasay, Against Politics, s. 172–179; oraz Herbener, The Pareto Rule and Welfare Economics, s. 105.

[76] Objęcie rzeczy w posiadanie „może przybrać trzy postaci: (1) jej bezpośrednie fizyczne zagarnięcie, (2) jej ukształtowanie oraz (3) jej oznaczenie jako naszej.” Palmer, Are Patents and Copyrights Morally Justified?, s. 838.

[77] Nie muszę również odwoływać się do „posiadania” pracy – mówiąc ściśle, pracy posiadać nie można. Nie muszę też odwoływać się do własności pracy, by zachować mienie, które przetworzyłem.

[78] Palmer, Are Patents and Copyrights…?, s. 838 (podkreślenie własne), cytuje: Georg W. F. Hegel, Hegel’s Philosophy of Right, tłum. T. M. Knox, 1821; wznowienie, Oxford University Press, London 1967, s. 45–46.

[79] Nawet tacy obrońcy IP jak Rand nie utrzymują, że tworzenie per se jest wystarczające, aby dać początek własności, czy nawet, że tworzenie jest konieczne. Niezbędne nie jest, gdyż własność niczyją wystarczy zawłaszczyć przez jej objęcie, co nie wymaga „tworzenia,” o ile nie rozszerzamy tego pojęcia ponad umiar. Nie jest też wystarczające – Rand zapewne nie utrzymywałaby, że tworzenie przedmiotu z surowców będących własnością innych daje złodziejowi-twórcy prawo własności. Ze stanowiska Rand nawet wynika, że prawa, w tym prawa własności, pojawiają się jedynie w przypadku możliwości istnienia konfliktu. Rand uważa na przykład, że prawa jako pojęcie społeczne powstają jedynie wówczas, gdy istnieje więcej niż z jedna osoba. Patrz: Rand, Man’s Rights, [w:] Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal, s. 321: „>>Uprawnienie<< jest regułą moralną określającą i sankcjonującą w kontekście społecznym wolność działania człowieka.” Rzeczywiście, Rand twierdzi, iż „prawa człowieka można naruszyć jedynie poprzez przemoc fizyczną.” The Nature of Government, [wyd. pol. Natura rządu] [w:] Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal, s. 330. Na s. 334 Rand próbuje (bez powodzenia) istnienie rządu, czynnika egzekwującego prawo, usprawiedliwić w oparciu o założenie, że zdarzają się „uczciwe nieporozumienia” – tj. konflikty – nawet między „w pełni racjonalnymi i moralnie doskonałymi” ludźmi. Tak, wg teorii Rand, kreacja per se nie jest warunkiem ani koniecznym, ani wystarczającym, podobnie jak w teorii własności bronionej w niniejszym artykule.

[80] To właśnie z tych powodów nie zgadzam się z opartym na kreacji podejściu takich obiektywistów jak David Kelley czy Murray Franck. Według Francka (Intellectual and Personality Property, s. 7), „mimo że prawa własności pomagają >>racjonować<< rzadkość, to sama rzadkość nie stanowi podstawy praw własności. Pogląd, iż tak jest (…) zdaje się odwracać przyczynę i skutek, bowiem prawo bierze za funkcję potrzeb społeczeństwa, a nie rzecz przyrodzoną jednostce, skutkiem tego zmuszonej do obcowania ze społeczeństwem.”

Nie jestem pewien, co znaczy stwierdzenie, że prawa, które dotyczą relacji międzyludzkich i mają zastosowanie tylko jako koncepcja społeczna, są „przyrodzone” jednostce czy że są „funkcją” czegokolwiek. Pierwsza część powyższej opinii nawiązuje do pozytywizmu (sugerując, że prawa mają „źródło,” tak jakby mogły być nadane dekretem Boga czy rządu), natomiast druga do scjentyzmu (ze względu na użycie ściśle matematycznego czy też mającego zastosowanie w naukach przyrodniczych pojęcia „funkcji”). Natomiast argument za prawami własności nie jest oparty na potrzebie „racjonowania” rzadkich dóbr, ale na ludzkiej potrzebie używania środków do osiągania celów oraz unikania konfliktów o te środki. Zatem rzadkość nie jest „fundamentem” praw własności, ale koniecznym warunkiem otoczenia. Bez tego warunku prawa własności nie mogą powstać i mieć sensu – konflikty toczą się tylko o rzadkie zasoby, a występujące obficie. (Jak wskazano w przypisie powyżej, obiektywiści zgadzają się także co do tego, że możliwość konfliktu jest właśnie tego typu koniecznym warunkiem praw własności.)

Co więcej, przedstawiona tu argumentacja w oparciu o rzadkość jest nie bardziej „funkcją potrzeb społeczeństwa” niż w obiektywistycznym spojrzeniu Francka. Wierzy on, iż ludziom dla przetrwania „potrzebna” jest możliwość tworzenia przedmiotów – w otoczeniu społecznym, gdzie obecność innych ludzi sprawia, że możliwe są spory. „Zatem,” system prawny powinien bronić prawa do posiadania stworzonych rzeczy. Ale przecież argumentacja rzadkości podkreśla fakt, iż ludzie „potrzebują” możliwości używania rzadkich zasobów, co wymaga unikania konfliktów – dlatego też system prawny powinien przydzielać prawa własności do rzadkich zasobów. Bez względu na wady i zalety obu stanowisk, argumentacja wychodząca od rzadkości nie jest wcale bardziej kolektywistyczna niż ta wychodząca od kreacji, wcale nie bardziej indywidualistyczna.

Kelley (Response to Kinsella, s. 13) pisze: „Prawa własności są niezbędne, ponieważ człowiek podtrzymuje swoje życie za pomocą rozumu. Podstawowym zadaniem w tym zakresie jest stworzenie takich wartości, które zaspokajają ludzkie potrzeby, a nie poleganie na tym, co znajdziemy w naturze, jak czynią zwierzęta. (…) [Z]asadniczym fundamentem praw własności jest zjawisko tworzenia wartości. (…) Rzadkość staje się istotnym problemem, kiedy rozpatrujemy użycie zasobów takich jak ziemia w procesie tworzenia wartości. Z zasady, żeby przywłaszczyć sobie elementy otoczenia i uczynić je własnością, niezbędne są moim zdaniem dwa warunki: 1) ktoś musi te elementy produktywnie wykorzystać i 2) to produktywne wykorzystanie musi wymagać wyłącznej nad nimi kontroli, tzn. prawa wykluczenia innych. (…) Warunek (2) jest zasadny gdy zasób jest rzadki. Lecz dla rzeczy, które ktoś stworzył – całkiem nowych – to akt tworzenia, niezależnie od rzadkości, jest źródłem prawa” (podkreślenie własne).

Przyczyny, dla których nie zgadzam się z Kelley’em powinny być oczywiste, pozwolę sobie jednak zauważyć, że każde ludzkie działanie, także tworzenie „wartości,” musi polegać na użyciu rzadkich środków, tj. materialnych zasobów tego świata. W każdym akcie tworzenia używane są rzeczy zrobione z istniejących już atomów; ani istnienie tego faktu, ani uznanie go, nie sprawia, iż jest to zwierzęce w jakimkolwiek pejoratywnym rozumieniu. To, że ludzie, w przeciwieństwie do zwierząt, chcą tworzyć wartości wyższego rzędu przez użycie rzadkich zasobów, ani na jotę tego spostrzeżenia nie zmienia. Po drugie, Kelley broni dwóch odrębnych zasad zawłaszczenia rzadkich zasobów: poprzez pierwsze użycie oraz poprzez stworzenie nowego, użytecznego bądź artystycznego wzoru, które daje twórcy prawo do powstrzymania innych przed skorzystaniem z podobnych wzorów do przetworzenia, nawet ich własnych, zasobów. Jak uzasadniono niżej, te dwie reguły pozostają ze sobą w konflikcie i tylko pierwsza może znaleźć uzasadnienie. Poza tym, Kelley utrzymuje, iż twórca nowego produktu posiada go niezależnie od rzadkości., bo go stworzył. Jeśli Kelley mówi o produkcie materialnym, jak pułapka na myszy, to dobro takie jest rzeczywiste, rzadkie i materialne. Przypuszczalnie twórca posiadał rzadkie surowce, które przekształcił w produkt końcowy. Ale nie potrzebuje on prawa do posiadania idealnego obiektu – pomysłu czy schematu pułapki na myszy – by posiadać sam produkt finalny; on już wszedł w posiadanie surowców i wciąż je posiada po zmianie ich kształtu. Jeżeli natomiast Kelley ma na myśli, że przez stworzenie szablonu czy idei, nabywa się prawo do kontrolowania rzadkich zasobów należących do innych, to broni on nowej zasady zawłaszczenia, którą krytykuję poniżej.

[81] Patrz np.: Murray N. Rothbard, Economic Thought Before Adam Smith: An Austrian Perspective on the History of Economic Thought, t. 1, Edward Elgar, Brookfield, Vt. 1995, s. 453: „To właśnie Adam Smith ponosi niemal pełną odpowiedzialność za wprowadzenie do ekonomii laborystycznej teorii wartości. Zatem z czystym sumieniem można obciążyć go winą za narodziny i przemożne skutki marksizmu.” Nawet skądinąd rozsądnym myślicielom zdarza się kłaść nadmierny nacisk na znaczenie pracy w procesie zawłaszczenia i możliwość jej „posiadania.” Sam Rothbard, na przykład, sugeruje, że człowiek „posiada siebie, a więc i swoją pracę.” Rothbard, Justice and Property Rights, s. 284, podkreślenie własne; patrz także: Rothbard, The Ethics of Liberty, s. 49. Metafory o „posiadaniu swojej pracy” (życia czy idei) wprowadzają jedynie w błąd. Prawo korzystania czy czerpania zysku z własnej pracy jest wyłącznie konsekwencją kontroli nad ciałem, tak jak prawo „wolności słowa” jest tylko konsekwencją, czy pochodną, prawa własności prywatnej, jak Rothbard wskazywał w The Ethics

Zgłoś swój pomysł na artykuł

Więcej w tym dziale Zobacz wszystkie

Na naszej stronie korzystamy z plików cookies w celu spersonalizowania reklam, więcej informacji.